Jean Paul Gaultier

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Jean Paul Gaultier

Universe of Fashion

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier:
From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

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The Odyssey of Jean Paul Gaultier

Universe
of Fashion

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier:
From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

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    The Odyssey of Jean Paul Gaultier

    Jean Paul Gaultier was born in 1952 in Arceuil, a suburb of Paris. As a teenager he designed two collections a year, taking his inspiration from fashion magazines, films of the interwar period and 1960s television shows like Dim, Dam, Dom that covered fashion.

    His maternal grandmother owned a television, which was uncommon in France at that time, and she let him watch whatever he liked. Jean Paul Gaultier developed a critical and analytical sense of fashion as well as his own design vocabulary.

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    The Odyssey of Jean Paul Gaultier

    Fascinated by unusual Parisiennes, he created a new look and favoured unconventional types of beauty: “As a child, my attention was always drawn by those women who didn’t look like everyone else.”

    In the 1970s, the self-taught designer discovered the tradition and art of haute couture at the houses of Pierre Cardin and Jean Patou. Parting ways with the new generation of “designers”, he plunged into women’s prêt-à-porter in 1976 and men’s prêt-à-porter in 1983.

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    The Odyssey of Jean Paul Gaultier

    Jean Paul Gaultier remained true to his ideal of Parisian elegance and, twenty years later, opened his own couture house. From then on he has presented two collections each year, combining these with other creations designed for Hermès between 2004 and 2010.

    Virgins (or Madonnas) collection,
    Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

    Romantic India collection
    Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

    Virgins (or Madonnas) collection
    Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

    THE BOUDOIR

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      THE BOUDOIR

      With its handmade conical falsies, Nana the teddy bear is the touching witness to the first creative steps of Jean Paul Gaultier who, as a little boy, was fascinated by the old-fashioned charm of corsets. His maternal grandmother Marie introduced him at a very young age to women’s fashions and Falbalas, the Jacques Becker film that narrates the rise of a young couturier.

      Brought up by strong women, the couturier does not subscribe to the myth of the weaker sex. He humorously reinterprets corsets, symbols of the incarcerated female body.

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      THE BOUDOIR

      Although Gaultier’s corseted women seem to be a negation of feminist struggles, in reality the corset, far from being an instrument of torture that imprisons women’s bodies, now embodies the new power of the female and shapes its counterpoint of the male jacket, the distant progeny of the medieval knight’s suit of armour. Many stars have worn versions of his corsets with concentrically topstitched bra cups: Madonna tops the list, with the iconic designs for the 1990 Blond Ambition World Tour, but Catherine Ringer, Cindy Sherman, Grace Jones, Dita Von Teese and Kylie Minogue have also sported these creations.

      Sketch, Blond Ambition World Tour
      Jean Paul Gaultier

      Bad Girls–G Spot collection
      Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

      Sketch, Blond Ambition World Tour
      Jean Paul Gaultier

      SKIN
      DEEP

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        SKIN DEEP

        For Jean Paul Gaultier, the skin and the body are inexhaustible sources of inspiration. In his hands, materials become “second skins”. In opposition to the rule of thinness, he has offered the sensuality of plus sizes and sent out a powerful message: Be yourself, no matter what nature and culture have dealt you!

        For his runway shows, he held the first open casting calls, recruiting with classified advertisements that read: “Non-conformist designer seeks unusual models—the conventionally pretty need not apply.”

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        SKIN DEEP

        In the early 1980s, Jean Paul Gaultier began introducing a diversity of genres, offering everyone the freedom to choose their own identity: über-woman, butch, trophy girl, boy toy or anything in between. In the summer of 1985, the designer wrote a new page in the history of fashion with his collection A Wardrobe for Two, in which he explored masculine, feminine, androgynous and alternative conventions. With his skirt for men, he reinstated the nobility of the exotic male wardrobe.

        The Hussars collection
        Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

        Madonna performing Confessions Tour

        Gaultier Classics Revisited collection
        Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

        PUNK
        CAN
        CAN

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          Punk cancan

          Jean Paul Gaultier was born in the Parisian suburbs, but his heart beats to the rhythm of both rough-and-ready Paris and rock-attitude London. He is fascinated by the Paris of the Belle Époque and the interwar years, the Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec and the Moulin Rouge, the colourful throngs of the Barbès area and, of course, the Eiffel Tower. He loves the postcard capital that brings to mind the Parisians in Brassaï’s photographs, the local wenches and rogues that frequented the city’s bistros and cabarets.

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          Punk cancan

          These many visions of Paris set the stage for the multifaceted character to which Jean Paul Gaultier unflaggingly pays court: the Parisienne.

          La Goulue, Arletty, Micheline Presle and Juliette Gréco are his Parisian icons. He gives new twists to their classic accoutrements: beret, trench coat, cigarette holder, houndstooth checks, gingham and baguette. His Parisienne alternately morphs into a 1940s existentialist or a 1950s couture customer.

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          Punk cancan

          In the early 1970s Gaultier travelled to London and got his first look at the ground-breaking styles adopted by the punks of Trafalgar Square. The anti-materialist principles of punk would have an influence on the designer, enabling him to explore a nonconformist fashion inspired by the energy of London’s streets, Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLaren’s SEX boutique, and the glam rock movement spearheaded by David Bowie and his alter ego Ziggy Stardust. Penury forced him to be inventive; the total rebellion, the trash and “destroy” look appealed to him.

          Movie Stars (or Cinema) collection
          Mathieu Baumer

          Parisiennes collection
          Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

          First collection
          Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

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            URBAN
            JUNGLE

            Jean Paul Gaultier is fascinated by differences. Transposing, reappropriating and assembling, he unites realms untouched by the hallowed halls of fashion, combining societies and individuals separated by language, custom and geography that merge on “Planet Gaultier”.

            Starting with his Return of Prints collection (spring/summer 1984), Gaultier created a blend of Africa and Europe by making boubous out of miniskirts and placing fezzes on his models’ heads.

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            URBAN
            JUNGLE

            His next collection, Barbés (fall/winter 1984-1985), took this fusion to a more radical level.

            In a context of globalised markets where the majority imposes generic fashion and minorities sequester themselves in ghettoes, Jean Paul Gaultier reassembles the parts of the whole to create a multiethnic personality. He imagines society as a cocktail: mixed, stirred, spiced, varied and decompartmentalised.

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            URBAN
            JUNGLE

            When multiculturalism falters before the challenge of integration, Gaultier offers the product of a single melting pot: society no longer consists of groups living side by side yet indifferent to one another, but of individuals who tell the story of our own diversity.

            URBAN JUNGLE

            Swashbuckler collection
            Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

            Romantic India collection
            Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

            The Surrealists collection
            Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

            Metr
            opol
            i

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              METRÓPOLI

              In the late 1970s, Gaultier began borrowing from the realm of science fiction and the emerging sounds of new wave and house music. He introduced hi-tech materials like vinyl, lycra and neoprene to prêt-à-porter, and created innovative blends such as neoprene-coated leather, 3D textiles and even inflatable fabrics. He also brought out his first pieces of electronic jewellery, created by his companion and associate Francis Menuge.

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              METRÓPOLI

              This futuristic vision of fashion has also been reflected in his memorable collaborations with pop and rock stars who wear his designs on stage or in their videos: Tina Turner, Nirvana, Lady Gaga, Les Rita Mitsouko, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Niagara, Neneh Cherry, Depeche Mode, Beyoncé, Yvette Horner, Mylène Farmer, Boy George, Cameo, Kylie Minogue and, of course, Madonna.

              Between 1983 and 1993, Jean Paul Gaultier designed the costumes for sixteen ballets staged by the French choreographer Régine Chopinot. This association served as a veritable laboratory for the couturier: the structures and materials of his designs suggested and sometimes even imposed certain rhythms and gestures on the dancers. His exceptional collaboration with the dance world has also led him to work with Angelin Preljocaj, Karole Armitage, Maurice Béjart and Joaquín Cortés.

              Movie Stars (or Cinema) collection
              Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

              Victoria Abril in Kika

              Cagescollection
              Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

              Jean Paul Gaultier & Pedro Almodóvar

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                Jean Paul Gaultier & Pedro Almodóvar

                “The costumes Jean Paul Gaultier designs are wonderfully beautiful and absolutely ‘conceptual’ at the same time. Almost no one else is able to combine both in the same garment.”
                – Pedro Almodóvar

                Jean Paul Gaultier has been fascinated by movies and variety shows since early childhood. In fact, as co-host of the programme Eurotrash, he was the first fashion designer to become a television star, at a time when fashion was on the rise as a powerful form of expression in an image-obsessed society.

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                Jean Paul Gaultier & Pedro Almodóvar

                He loves turning fashion into spectacle, and sees runway shows as happenings, trips to special worlds of his devising, with their own original soundtracks, decors and unusual casting choices.

                The costumes that Jean Paul Gaultier has designed for the silver screen sustain the dramatic intensity of the films while remaining true to his own creative vocabulary, as evidenced by his collaborations with Marc Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet (The City of Lost Children), Peter Greenaway (The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover), Luc Besson (The Fifth Element) and, above all, Pedro Almodóvar.

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                Jean Paul Gaultier & Pedro Almodóvar

                Kika, Bad Education and, most recently, The Skin I Live In are the products of a partnership between two brilliantly likeminded individuals. With each garment he designs, Jean Paul Gaultier is able to capture and bring to life the emotional map that Pedro Almodóvar sketches with his characters. At the same time, Gaultier’s universe meshes perfectly with the worldview expressed in Almodóvar’s films, and together they achieve an almost unrivalled intensity and rapport.

                Victoria Abril, Jean Paul Gaultier
                and Rossy de Palma

                Collection Riders and Horsewomen of Modern Times (o Mad Max)

                List
                of Works

                Our sincere thanks to the artists who have worked with us

                Intro

                • Sofia Sanchez et Mauro Mongiello, Jean Paul Gaultier, 2009 © Sofia Sanchez y Mauro Mongiello

                L’Odyssée
                de Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Kate Barry Main staircase, house of Gaultier headquarters, Paris, 2010 © Kate Barry / Côté Paris

                • Pierre et Gilles Jean Paul Gaultier, 1990 Designed specially to illustrate the cover of the autobiographical photonovel À Nous Deux la mode Painted photograph, framed by the artists 112 x 92 cm (framed) Private collection, Paris © Pierre et Gilles / Photographed by Rainer Torrado

                • Virgins (or Madonnas) collection, “Apparitions” gown Haute couture spring/summer 2007 “Celestial” print satin strapless sheath; bustier-style top with “hologram” embroidery and bows, ivory silk tulle overskirt; “hologram” and ivory lace veil © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Romantic India collection, “Lascar” gown Haute couture spring/summer 2000 Navy and ivory “sailor-striped sweater” silk knit gown extending into a skirt with glossy ostrich feathers arranged in stripes 30th anniversary retrospective runway show, October 2006 © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Virgins (or Madonnas) collection, “Lumière” gown Haute couture spring/summer 2007 Black and stained glass print jersey and chiffon gown with cape-style sleeve © Patrice Stable/Jean Paul Gaultier

                LE BOUDOIR

                • Jean Paul Gaultier, Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris, about 1957 © Rights reserved / Jean Paul Gaultier archives

                • Emil Larsson Body corset worn by Madonna, Blond Ambition World Tour, 1990 Dazed & Confused, April 2008 © Emil Larsson

                • Jean Paul Gaultier’s teddy bear, Nana, wearing the first cone bra © Rainer Torrado / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Jean Paul Gaultier and his maternal grandmother, Marie, about 1958 © Rights reserved / Jean Paul Gaultier archives

                • Sketch of Madonna’s stage costume, Blond Ambition World Tour, 1989–1990 © Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Bad Girls–G Spot collection Women’s prêt-à-porter spring/summer 2010 © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Sketch of Madonna’s stage costume, Blond Ambition World Tour, 1989–1990 © Jean Paul Gaultier

                A FLEUR DE PEAU

                • William Baker Kylie Minogue Virgins (or Madonnas) collection, “Immaculata” gown Haute couture spring/summer 2007 Net lace dress with large patterned embroidery and white linen cutouts © 2008, Darenote Ltd. All rights reserved.

                • Ze Parisienne collection, “French Cancan” gown Haute couture spring/summer 2002 Bodysuit and long tutu of flesh-colored pleated tulle Model: Carla Bruni-Sarkozy © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • The Hussars collection, “Incognito” ensemble Haute couture fall/winter 2002–2003 Long black silk velvet raglan-sleeve coat quilted and lined with crepe de Chine; “head to toe” trompe-l’oeil silk jacquard sheath © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Madonna interprétant « Future Lovers » et « I Feel Love », Confessions Tour, stade AWD, Hanovre, 22 août 2006 © Stefan Simonsen / AP / Wide World Photos

                • Gaultier Classics Revisited collection Women’s prêt-à-porter spring/summer 1993 Model: Ève Salvail © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                Punk cancan

                • Mathieu Baumer Backstage (Lara Stone), runway show, July 7, 2009 Movie Stars (or Cinema) collection, “Le Mépris” Haute couture fall/winter 2009–2010 Pleated lambskin trench coat with winged shoulder flaps, film stock–motif perforations and satin organza inserts, pleated lining © Mathieu Baumer

                • Parisiennes collection Haute couture fall/winter 2010–2011 Fishnet tights with Eiffel Tower motif © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • First collection Women’s prêt-à-porter spring/summer 1977 30th anniversary retrospective runway show, October 2006 © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                JUNGLE URBAINE

                • Ellen von Unwerth Survivors (Laetitia Casta, Vladimir McCary and Jenny Shimizu) Tattoos collection Women’s prêt-à-porter spring/summer 1994 © Ellen von Unwerth

                • Divine Jacqueline collection, “Espagnolade” gown Haute couture spring/summer 1999 Tea rose satin gown with ex-voto fans © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Swashbuckler collection, “Ensorceleuse” ensemble Haute couture fall/winter 2004–2005 Suntan python-skin bodysuit and skirt with primitive-look copper object and nail embroidery; matching feathered sombrero © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Romantic India collection, “Dubar” gown Haute couture spring/summer 2000 “Camouflage” evening gown featuring myriad khaki, cinnamon and papaya tulle ruffles © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • The Surrealists collection, “Hécate” gown Haute couture fall/winter 2006–2007 Black moiré-finish faille coatdress with feathered “cockerel” sleeve; “top hat” hairstyle by Odile Gilbert © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                METROPOLI

                • Herb Ritts, Jean Paul Gaultier, Tokio, 1990 © Herb Ritts Foundation

                • Movie Stars (or Cinema) collection, “Étoiles et toiles” gown Haute couture fall/winter 2009–2010 Acetate-film-covered corset edged with black satin, articulated shoulders and hips, georgette film-stock-print sheath skirt © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                • Victoria Abril dans Kika, réalisé par Pedro Almodóvar, 1993 © Jean-Marie Leroy / El Deseo D.A. S.L.U.

                • Cages collection, “Calligraphie” gown Haute couture fall/winter 2008–2009 Sequined canary chiffon sheath with fine black lace overlay topped by a cage-style canary and black silk satin “wicker mannequin” bust extending into a flared scrollwork of coils © Patrice Stable / Jean Paul Gaultier

                Jean Paul Gaultier &
                Pedro Almodóvar

                • Victoria Abril in Kika, directed by Pedro Almodóvar, 1993 © Jean-Marie Leroy / El Deseo D.A. S.L.U. With special thanks to Victoria Abril

                • La piel que habito © El Deseo D.A. S.L.U. With special thanks to Elena Anaya. Photographed by: José Haro

                • La mala educación © El Deseo D.A. S.L.U. With special thanks to Gael García Bernal. Photographed by: Diego López Calvín

                • Pedro Almodóvar, Victoria Abril as Kika and Jean Paul Gaultier, 1993.
                  Published in ELLE magazine, 1993
                  © Nacho Pinedo

                • Victoria Abril, Jean Paul Gaultier and Rossy de Palma, backstage after the designer's ready-to-wear fashion show.
                  © Rainer Torrado

                • Rossy de Palma modelling for the Riders and Horsewomen of Modern Times (or Mad Max) collection, Women's Prêt-à-porter fall/winter 1995-1996

                WEBSITE

                • Site management and coordination
                  Paula Susaeta
                  Javier Lucas

                • Virtual tour
                  VISIONANGULAR

                • Design and production
                  TECKNOSFERA

                Catalogue

                • Editor
                  Thierry-Maxime Loriot

                • FUNDACIÓN MAPFRE

                • Coordination
                  Paula Susaeta

                • Translation
                  Polisemia SL

                • Copy editing
                  TF Editores

                • Design
                  Paprika.com (Louis Gagnon,
                  René Clément, Jean Doyon,
                  Claude Labrie, Marie-Andrée
                  Poirier), Montreal

                • Adaptation for this edition
                  Juan Antonio Moreno

                • Typesetting and prepress
                  Cromotex

                • Printing
                  TF Artes Gráficas

                • Binding
                  Ramos, S.A.

                • The Spanish version of this book was published by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and Fundación MAPFRE.

                Exhibition

                • FUNDACIÓN MAPFRE

                • Director of Exhibitions
                  Nadia Arroyo Arce

                • Chief Conservator
                  María López Fernández

                • Curator
                  Thierry‑Maxime Loriot

                • Coordination
                  Paula Susaeta

                • Restoration
                  Jorge García
                  Nieves Peñalver
                  Silvia Montero
                  Laura Cerrato
                  Clara M. Prieto
                  Gema Alvaro
                  Rosa Plaza Santiago

                • Registrar
                  Pedro Benito

                • Exhibition design
                  Instalación: Projectiles (Reza Azard, Hervé Bouttet, Daniel Meszaros), París
                  Guión y vídeos para maniquíes animados: Denis Marleau y Stephanie Jasmin, UBU, Montreal

                • Adaptation for Madrid
                  Sandra Gagné, Juan Antonio Moreno

                • Assembly management and lighting design
                  Pedro Benito

                • Assembly
                  Exmoarte, S.A.

                • Mannequins
                  Jolicoeur International Inc.

                • Transport
                  SIT Transportes
                  Internacionales, S.A.

                • Insurance
                  MAPFRE EMPRESAS

                • FUNDACIÓN MAPRE is equally grateful to the Istituto Europeo di Design in Madrid, and in particular to the director Ricardo Marzullo, the director of communications Marisa Santamaría, and Ako Zararashvili and Antonio Velasco.

                • avril 24, 1952

                  Jean Paul Gaultier is born

                  in Arcueil, a Paris suburb,

                  to a family of modest means

                  with no connections to the

                  fashion world. As a teenager,

                  he designs two collections

                  a year, taking inspiration

                  from the top designers

                  and fashion magazines.

                • 1970

                  After sending his sketches

                  to several Paris-based

                  designers, on his eighteenth

                  birthday he is hired

                  as a studio assistant

                  by Pierre Cardin.

                • 1971-1975

                  For two years Gaultier works

                  part time in the couture

                  houses of Jacques Esterel

                  and Jean Patou before

                  returning in 1974 to work

                  for Pierre Cardin, this time in

                  Manila (the Philippines),

                  where he designs collections

                  for the American market.

                • 1976

                  He establishes his own

                  prêt-à-porter label with the

                  help of his life partner

                  Francis Menuge and presents

                  his first collection,

                  totally self-financed, at

                  the Palais de la découverte

                  planetarium, Paris.

                • 1978

                  Dominique Emschwiller,

                  manager of the Paris boutique

                  Bus the Japanese firm

                  Kashiyama play a key role

                  in getting finance and

                  distribute what becomes

                  Gaultier’s first commercial

                  collection: the Women’s

                  prêt-à-porter line for Bus

                  Stop (Jean Paul Femme de Bus

                  Stop (Jean Paul Gaultier

                  for Bus Stop).

                • 1981

                  The professional and

                  financial stability that

                  Gaultier gains from his

                  agreement with Kashiyama,

                  which continues to produce,

                  under licence, the Jean Paul

                  Gaultier line for the

                  Japanese and Far East market,

                  combined with his new

                  agreements with clothing

                  manufacturers Gibò (warp and

                  wool) and Equator (wool)

                  allow him to found

                  the brand Jean Paul

                  Gaultier with Francis Menuge.

                • 1983

                  Gaultier presents his first

                  corset-style dresses, soon

                  to become his signature

                  designs. The company continues

                  to grow and his first Men’s

                  prêt-à-porter collection is

                  presented. He embarks on a

                  close relationship with the

                  world of show business, marking

                  the beginning of a ten-year,

                  sixteen-show collaboration

                  with the choreographer

                  Régine Chopinot.

                • 1985

                  The men’s skirt is introduced

                  at the presentation of the

                  And God Created Man collection.

                • 1986

                  The first Jean Paul

                  Gaultier boutique opens

                  in Galerie Vivienne, Paris.

                • 1988

                  The first Junior Gaultier

                  line is launched, offering

                  Gaultier basics at more

                  affordable prices.

                • 1989

                  Gaultier demonstrates the

                  versatility of his talents by

                  recording the house music song

                  “Aow Tou Dou Zat” How To Do

                  That) with British ( producer

                  Tony Mansfield. He designs

                  the costumes for Peter

                  Greenaway’s film The Cook,

                  the Thief, His Wife and

                  Her Lover.

                • 1990

                  Gaultier designs the stage

                  costumes for Madonna’s Blond

                  Ambition World Tour,

                  marking the first of

                  several collaborations.

                  He also designs costumes for

                  accordionist Yvette Horner's

                  show at the Casino de Paris.

                  The autobiographical

                  photonovel À Nous Deux

                  la mode is published.

                • 1992

                  A collection of mobile furniture

                  evoking travel is presented

                  at Galerie VIA (Valorisation de

                  [highlighting innovation in

                  furniture]) in Paris.

                  The retrospective runway show

                  Jean Paul Gaultier in L.A. is

                  held at the Shrine Auditorium

                  in Los Angeles to raise funds

                  for the American Foundation

                  for AIDS Research (amfAR).

                • 1993

                  Classique, his first fragrance for

                  women, is launched. The

                  television show Eurotrash

                  premieres on Britain’s Channel

                  4, co-hosted by Gaultier and

                  Antoine deCaunes. Gaultier

                  designs the costumes for Pedro

                  Almodóvar’s film Kika, the first

                  of a number of collaborations.

                • 1995

                  Le Male, his first fragrance for

                  men, is launched. Gaultier hosts

                  the MTV Europe Music Awards in

                  Paris. He designs the costumes

                  for the film The City of Lost

                  Children, directed by Marc

                  Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

                • 1996

                  Gaultier creates the costumes

                  for Luc Besson’s film

                  The Fifth Element.

                • 1997

                  The first haute couture

                  collection, Haute Couture Salon

                  Atmosphere, is launched under

                  the GAULTIER Paris label.

                • 1999

                  Fragile, a new fragrance

                  for women, is launched.

                • 2000

                  Gaultier receives an

                  International Award from

                  the Council of Fashion

                  Designers of

                  America (CFDA).

                • 2001

                  He designs the costumes for

                  the “Geisha” and “Flamenco”

                  sequences of Madonna’s

                  Drowned World Tour.

                  He designs the costumes for

                  the Gabriel Aghion film

                  Absolutely Fabulous.

                  Gaultier is named a Chevalier

                  of the Order of the Legion

                  of Honour of the

                  French Republic.

                • 2003

                  Nicole Kidman receives the

                  Oscar for Best Actress for

                  her performance in Stephen

                  Daldry’s film The Hours. She

                  wears a gown from the haute

                  couture collection Buttons.

                  découverte planetarium in

                  Hermès hires Gaultier as

                  creative director of Women’s

                  prêt-à-porter following a

                  collaboration agreement signed

                  in 1999. Tout beau, tout

                  propre, Gaultier’s first men’s cosmetic

                  and skincare line, is launched.

                • 2004

                  Gaultier’s first collection for

                  Hermès is presented (Women’s

                  prêt-à-porter, fall/winter 2004

                  -2005). He designs the costumes

                  for Pedro Almodóvar’s film

                  Bad Education.

                • 2005

                  The unisex fragrance

                  GAULTIER² is launched.

                • 2006

                  Gaultier designs the

                  costumes for Madonna’s

                  Confessions Tour.

                • 2008

                  Gaultier designs the costumes

                  for Kyle Minogue’s X Tour 2008.

                  the ballet Show White,

                  choreographed by Angelin

                  Preljocaj. He designs a bottle

                  for Evian. Ma Dame, a new

                  fragrance for women, is

                  launched. Marion Cotillard

                  receives an Oscar and a César

                  for Best Actress for her

                  portrayal of Édith Piaf in the

                  directed by Olivier Dahan.

                  She wears gowns from the

                  Mermaids collection on

                  both occasions.

                • 2009

                  Gaultier designs the costumes

                  for Mylène Farmer’s No. 5 Tour.

                  The first Junior Gaultier

                  line for children is launched.

                • 2010

                  Gaultier launches of

                  a capsule collection (a

                  one-off collaboration with a

                  limited number of garments)

                  for the American chain

                  of boutiques Target and

                  designs another capsule

                  collection for La Perla.

                  He designs the Elle Décoration

                  Suite at the Palais Chaillot, Paris.

                  He collaborates with

                  Roche-Bobois on the design of

                  the Jean Paul Gaultier mobile

                  furniture line as well as the

                  re-issue of iconic pieces designed

                  for Galerie VIA in 1992.

                  In New York he receives

                  the amfAR Inspiration Award for

                  his contribution commitment to

                  humanitarian causes, dating back

                  to the Nineties with

                  initiatives such as the

                  retrospective runway show

                  Jean Paul Gaultier

                  in L.A.

                  He presents his last collection

                  for Hermés (Women’s prêt-à-porter,

                  spring-summer 2011).

                • 2011

                  Gaultier designs the costumes

                  for Pedro Almodóvar’s film

                  The Skin I live In.

                  Puig a fashion and fragrance family

                  business acquired the French

                  fashion house Jean Paul Gaultier.

                  The Montreal Museum of

                  Fine Arts organises the first

                  exhibition to celebrate

                  the designer's thirty-five

                  year career.

                • 2012

                  Fifth collaboration with Madonna

                  as designer of the costumes

                  for the MDNA World Tour.

                  Gaultier designs three

                  limited-edition bottles for Diet Coke.

                  He designs the costumes

                  for the opera The Marriage

                  of Figaro at the Opéra

                  National, Montpellier.

                  The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

                  and the Maison Jean Paul Gaultier,

                  in association with

                  FUNDACIÓN MAPFRE,

                  host The Fashion World of

                  Jean Paul Gaultier: From

                  the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

                  in Madrid, presenting Spanish

                  audiences with their first glimpse

                  of the designer's work.

                  The show travels to Dallas,

                  San Francisco, Rotterdam,

                  Stockholm and New York.